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East Indies camp archives ( Indische kamparchieven ENG )

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Saint Vincentius Bidaratjina in Batavia

Town: Batavia
District: West Java
Region: Java
Location: Batavia (now Jakarta) is on the north coast of West Java. The Saint Vincent orphanage and boarding school was at Bidaratjina 76, in the southern part of the city.
From April 1943 to February 1945 this location served as a prisoner of war camp >>
Other name: Weeshuis en internaat voor meisjes van de Vincentius Vereeniging Batavia
Internees: prisoners of war
Information: From April 1943 the Saint Vincent girls’ orphanage was used as a hospital for sick prisoners of war, including seriously ill people from the Moluccan transports. In February 1945 the remaining prisoners of war were taken to the 10th Battalion, elsewhere in Batavia.
Guards: Koreans, heihos
Literature: Veenstra, J.H.W. e.a., Als krijgsgevangene naar de Molukken en Flores. Relaas van een Japans transport van Nederlandse en Engelse militairen 1943-1945 ('s-Gravenhage 1982)

From March 1945 to August 1945 this location served as a civilian camp >>
Other name: Weeshuis en internaat voor meisjes van de Vincentius Vereeniging Batavia
Internees: women and children
Number of deceased: 197 (May - October 1945)
Information: In March 1945, the girls’ orphanage and boarding school of the Sint-Vincentius Vereeniging (Saint Vincent Society) of Batavia became the general camp hospital for Batavia. Along with Mater Dolorosa, it was part of the Japanese general medical service for the camps. Both hospitals were run by one medical director. The staff were primarily “European” internees from the camps, including a few professors of medicine from the Medical Faculty in Batavia. Nuns did nursing and worked in the kitchen, and a group of 50 women from Camp Tjideng cared for the sick and kept the rooms clean. The sick were taken to the sleeping rooms of the orphanage and boarding school, which were encircled with barbed wire. There were separate infirmaries for women, children, and tuberculosis patients. Men stayed in the chapel. The death toll was very high; many had dysentery and hunger oedema. The names of the deceased were written daily on a chalkboard in one of the galleries. The doctors lt. col. Maisey en Smit were regularly abused by the head guards Fukui and Kanayama; camp commandant Mitsufuji was not a match for his underlings. Other doctors in the hospital were dr. H.A.P.C. Oomen and the paediatrician dr. A.M.G. Cramer.
Commendant: kpt. dr. Mitsufuji Yasuteru
Main guards: Kumazawa; Fukui; Kondo; Sachiyama; Arai; Kanayama; Kaneoka
Guards: Koreans, heihos
Camp leaders: dr. H. Hogerzeil; mw. dr. Brederode

From 23 August 1945 to October 1945 this location served as a relief camp >>
Other name: Weeshuis en internaat voor meisjes van de Vincentius Vereeniging Batavia
Internees: men, women, and children
Number of internees: 1.200
Number of deceased: 197 (May - October 1945)
Information: In March 1945, the girls’ orphanage and boarding school of the Sint-Vincentius Vereeniging (Saint Vincent Society) of Batavia became the general camp hospital for Batavia. At the time of the Japanese capitulation there were approximately 1,200 men, women, and children in the camp. The Japanese guards were replaced with Gurkhas. The food improved dramatically immediately after the Japanese surrender, while the inmates could also trade clothing for food at the camp edges. The care of the ill continued for some time. The death rate was high. At the end of October the camp was cleared.

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