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East Indies camp archives ( Indische kamparchieven ENG )

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Kramat in Batavia

Town: Batavia
District: West Java
Region: Java
Location: Batavia (now Jakarta) is on the north coast of West Java. Kramat was a “European” residential district in the southern part of the city center, on both sides of Raden Salehlaan.
From October 1942 to September 1943 this location served as a civilian camp >>
Internees: women and children
Number of internees: 3.600
Information: Between October 1942 and September 1943, primarily “totok” women and children from in and around Cheribon and Batavia were interned in the aging “European” Kramat district. They were housed in approximately 170 houses and outbuildings, spread over two complexes, one on either side of Raden Salehlaan. Each complex was encircled with barbed wire and gedek.
Main guards: Iwabuchi; Ishiwara; Tsuzuki; Matsuyama; Iino; Senda; Kawamoto; Kanai; Matsubara; Emoto
Guards: Native police personnel, heihos
Camp leaders: mw. E. Zeijlemaker-Bosman
Literature: Stouw-Lengkeek, E.G. van der, De hel van Tjideng. Herinneringen van Bep Groen, ex-gevangene Jappenkamp, oktober '42-december '45 (Barneveld 1995)
Roeloffs, P., Traces. Memoirs of an Indonesian wartime boyhood. Boys in Japanese P.O.W. camps (Medan 1998)
Roeloffs, P., Memoires 1939-1946 (Medan 1998)
Wilton van Reede, T. en A. Onderdenwijngaard, Een draad van angst. Over Japanse vrouwenkampen op Java en het leven daarna ('s-Gravenhage 1984)

From September 1943 to September 1944 this location served as a civilian camp >>
Other name: Bunsho I Kamp 2
Internees: working men; women and children
Number of internees: 2.100
Information: In September 1943, most of the women and children who were interned in the Kramat district were taken to the Tjideng district, elsewhere in Batavia. The southern part of the district was thereafter used as an internment area for working men and their families and for “European” women and children from Batavia, Buitenzorg, Tangerang and Bandoeng. They included nuns. They were housed in older “European” houses, communally encircled with barbed wire and gedek. After all 400 working men were taken in May 1944 to the 4th and 9th Battalions' Encampment in Tjimahi, 450 boys were transferred at the beginning of September to Camp Grogol. As a result, Kramat became once again a women’s and children’s camp.
Commendant: Sonei Kenichi
Main guards: Iwabuchi; Ishiwara; Tsuzuki; Matsuyama; Iino; Senda; Kawamoto; Kanai; Matsubara; Emoto
Guards: Native police personnel, heihos
Camp leaders: P.J. Rovers; dhr. De Vries

From September 1944 to 23 August 1945 this location served as a civilian camp >>
Other name: Bunsho I Kamp 2
Internees: women and children
Number of internees: 2.200
Information: After the working men and the boys had been sent from Kramat to, respectively, Tjimahi and Grogol, the homes and outbuildings in the southern part of Kramat were exclusively occupied by women and children. In November and December, groups of women from the camps Kota Paris (Buitenzorg), Tjihapit (Bandoeng) en ADEK (Batavia) came to Kramat, while women and children from Kramat were sent to other camps in Batavia.
Commendant: Sonei Kenichi; kpt. Maruyama Naosuke
Main guards: Iwabuchi; Ishiwara; Tsuzuki; Matsuyama; Iino; Senda; Kawamoto; Kanai; Matsubara; Emoto
Guards: Native police personnel, heihos
Camp leaders: mw. M.M. van Neuren-de Roy; mw. F.C. Bartholomeusz-Mulder
Literature: Stouw-Lengkeek, E.G. van der, De hel van Tjideng. Herinneringen van Bep Groen, ex-gevangene Jappenkamp, oktober '42-december '45 (Barneveld 1995)
Wilton van Reede, T. en A. Onderdenwijngaard, Een draad van angst. Over Japanse vrouwenkampen op Java en het leven daarna ('s-Gravenhage 1984)
Hélène, S., Is er nog een morgen? 1979)
Wertheim, W. en H. Wertheim-Gijse Weenink, Vier wendingen in ons bestaan. Indië verloren, Indonesië geboren (Breda 1991)
Bilderbeek, E. van, Kampkind 1942 tot 15 augustus 1945, verslag van een meisje t?dens de Japanse bezetting in het toenmalig Nederlands-Indië (Amsterdam 1992)
Ruff-O'Herne, J., 50 years of silence (Sydney 1994)

From 23 August 1945 to [1946] this location served as a relief camp >>
Internees: women and children
Number of internees: 2.400
Information: At the time of the Japanese capitulation, approximately 2,000 women and children were in the southern part of the Kramat district. In the bersiap period, the district became a relief camp for refugees and evacuees. In February 1946, there were 2,400 people in the district. The houses and garages, which were used a living space, were in poor condition. Leaking roofs could not be repaired, and the sewage facilities often failed.