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Baros 5 in Tjimahi

Town: Tjimahi
District: West Java
Region: Java
Location: Tjimahi is in West Java, northwest of Bandoeng. The native militia's encampment was east of Tjimahi, on the railway track, near Baros village.
From April 1942 to 25 October 1942 this location served as a prisoner of war camp >>
Other name: Kampement 6de Depot Bataljon Inheemse Militie, Kale Koppenkamp, Baros III (Van Velden)
Internees: prisoners of war
Number of internees: 5.012
Information: The new barracks camp of the 6th Depot Native Militia Battalion, which was built in 1939, functioned from April 1943 as a prisoner of war camp. It was encircled by barbed wire and gedek.
Commendant: lt.-kol. Kimura; lt. Kurashima Tomiji
Main guards: Aoki; Araki; Kazuyama; Higashihara; Kiyohara
Guards: Japanese military personnel, Koreans, heihos
Camp leaders: maj. P. Doornbosch
Literature: Liesker, H.A.M. e.a., Je denk, ken niet, maar kèn!! (Waddinxveen 1997)
Schoonenberg, B., De poorten der hel. Van Batavia tot Pakan Baroe, veertig maanden slavenarbeid in Japanse gevangenkampen 1942-1945 (Bussum 1978)
Verstraaten, A., Ooggetuige. Krijgsgevangen in Indië en Japan (1942-1945) (Zutphen 2008)

From 11 October 1943 to 23 August 1945 this location served as a civilian camp >>
Other name: Kampement 6de Depot Bataljon Inheemse Militie, Bamboekamp, Prominentenkamp, Bunsho II Kamp 5, Baros III (Van Velden)
Internees: men and boys
Number of internees: 3.065
Information: From October 1943, the encampment of the 6th Depot Native Militia Battalion served as an internment camp for men and boys. They were housed in barracks, which were encircled by barbed wire and gedek. In October 1944 the disposition of the barracks was changed to accommodate newly arrived so-called “prominent people”. Barracks 1 had until then sheltered NSB members; thereafter it held boys of 18 years an older. The boys under 18 were moved from barracks 21 and 22 to barracks 4. In the theatre barracks, barracks 18, Roman Catholic clergy were held. This barracks became known as “Vatican City”. Barracks 13, nicknamed “Tel Aviv”, remained the shelter for Jewish people and freemasons. The barracks 23, 24, and 25 remained infirmaries. The “prominent people” - higher-placed civil servants, professors and teachers, missionaries, preachers, higher police functionaries, and leading figures from the pre-war business scene - made up approximately half of the camp’s population. They were, along with the Jews and freemasons, called “djahats” (bad elements, wrongdoers) by the Japanese. They were required to wear a red triangle next to their camp number and were not permitted to perform chores outside the camp.
Commendant: lt. Kurashima Tomiji; kpt. Takagi Seigo; kpt. Kasahara Gengo
Main guards: Aoki; Araki; Kazuyama; Higashihara; Kiyohara
Guards: Japanese military personnel, Koreans, heihos
Camp leaders: J. Bos
Literature: Liesker, H.A.M. e.a., Je denk, ken niet, maar kèn!! (Waddinxveen 1997)
Liesker, H.A.M. e.a., 2603-1945, jongens in de mannenkampen te Tjimahi, Baros 5 en 4e/9e Bat. (Waddinxveen 1993)
Brugmans, I.J., Gevangen op Java. Dagboek uit een Jappenkamp, 1942-1945 (Zutphen 2004)
Ee, M. van (red.), Boys Town. Het ontstaan van Boys Town, barak 20 in het burgermannenkamp Baros 5 in Tjimahi, de periode okt.'43-okt.'44 en wat er daarna gebeurde. Een terugblik van een aantal onder ons op hun ervaring van toen (Soest 2002)

From 23 August 1945 to 23 November 1945 this location served as a relief camp >>
Other name: Kampement 6de Depot Bataljon Inheemse Militie, Bamboekamp, Prominentenkamp, Baros III (Van Velden)
Internees: men and boys
Number of internees: 2.400
Information: On 22 August 1945, the Japanese surrender was announced in the camp. The next day church services were held, and some days later the first Red Cross packets arrived. The heihos guarding the camp were replaced by Japanese soldiers. Trading was done on the gedek until a market opened in the camp. Visitors walked in and out of the camp. News arrived by radio and via pamphlets. On September 11th Major Greenwatch visited the camp in preparation for the RAPWI work, including family reunification. Simon Goldberg, a famous violinist interned at the camp, gave a concert in one of the barracks. In mid-September the number of camp residents was vastly reduced, among other reasons because the personnel of large companies had left. Because of the threat of instabilities, the ex-detainees remained in the camp. At the beginning of October there was unrest in Tjimahi. The market was forbidden, the Red Cross post closed down. Armed Indonesians drove salespeople away and Dutch people into the camp. The Japanese doubled the watch around the camp. On October 21st, British-Indies military personnel took over guarding the camp. Just over a month later the camp was cleared and the people went to the encampment of the Mountain Artillery, elsewhere in Tjimahi.
Commendant: kpt. Takagi Seigo
Main guards: Aoki
Camp leaders: J. Bos
Literature: Brugmans, I.J., Gevangen op Java. Dagboek uit een Jappenkamp, 1942-1945 (Zutphen 2004)