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Wonopringgo in Pekalongan

Town: Pekalongan
District: Central Java
Region: Java
Location: Pekalongan is situated on the northern coast of Central Java. The Wonopringgo sugar factory was approximately 10 kilometres south of Pekalongan.
From 29 November 1945 to 09 March 1947 this location served as a republican camp >>
Internees: men and boys
Information: A men’s camp was set up at the end of November 1945 on the grounds of the Wonopringgo sugar factory. The first group of men and boys taken there had originally been shut into the new prison at Pekalongan. To their number were added men and boys from Malang. The house was packed. There was no water line; water came from tanks. In the first months the food was bad, later that improved somewhat. Because sanitary facilities were inadequate, latrines were built by the canal. Medical care was poor. A series of transports in October and March 1947 evacuated the men and boys, along with their wives and children from the women’s camp elsewhere on the grounds.
Camp leaders: L.W.F. Krasy

From 18 April 1946 to 09 March 1947 this location served as a republican camp >>
Internees: women and children
Information: A men’s camp was set up at the end of November 1945 on the grounds of the Wonopringgo sugar factory. From April 1946, women and children who had been previously interned at the old prison in Pekalongan were brought to five other houses on the grounds. To their number were added women and children from the Government Reformatory in Malang. They were put into three large and four smaller rooms, some spaces in outbuildings, and a garage. Because there was almost no furniture, they slept on the ground on mats. There were almost no mattresses and mosquito nets. Most of the women prepared their own food. They were given 250 to 300 grams of rice per person per day, free, and there was a vegetable garden. Because the sanitary facilities were inadequate, latrines were built by the canal. Medical care was poor. In a series of transports in October 1946 and March 1947, the women and children were evacuated along with their husbands and sons from the men’s camp elsewhere on the grounds.
Camp leaders: mw. Koster