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East-Indies camps ( Indische kamparchieven ENG )

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Quarantine Station Berhala in Sandakan

Town: Sandakan
District: British Northern Borneo
Region: Borneo
Location: Sandakan is situated on the east coast of Northern Borneo. Berhala is an island off the coast.
From 12 May 1942 to 12 January 1943 this location served as a civilian camp >>
Internees: women and children
Number of internees: 20
Information: In May, 1942, the "European" civilians interned in Sandakan were transferred to an abandoned quarantine station for leprosy sufferers on Berhala, an island off the coast. In the quarantine station men and women were kept seprarated. Both camps lay approximately 100 metres from the ocean, and were encircled by high barbed-wire fences. People from the surrounding areas were also brought to the camps. The internees received two meals per day. Because they were cooked at the same time, the evening meal was cold. The food was bad: rice with chalk granules, a bit of fly-ridden fish, and vegetables with a lot of sand. After six weeks, the Chinese cooks left and the internees had to cook for themselves. Due to the poor quality of the food, many fell ill. After some time the internees were permitted to go down to the shore for a couple of hours daily. Men and women were still kept separated. In January 1943, the women were removed to Kuching.
Literature: Newton Keith, A., Vrouwenkamp Borneo (Naarden 1950-2)
Newton Keith, A., Three came home 1948)

From 12 May 1942 to 07 March 1943 this location served as a civilian camp >>
Internees: men
Number of internees: 80
Information: In May, 1942, the "European" civilians interned in Sandakan were transferred to an abandoned quarantine station for leprosy sufferers on Berhala, an island off the coast. In the quarantine station men and women were kept separated. Both camps lay approximately 100 metres from the ocean, and were encircled by high barbed-wire fences. People from the surrounding areas were also brought to the camps. The internees received two meals per day. Because they were cooked at the same time, the evening meal was cold. The food was bad: rice with chalk granules, a bit of fly-ridden fish, and vegetables with a lot of sand. After six weeks, the Chinese cooks left and the internees had to cook for themselves. Due to the poor quality of the food, many fell ill. After some time the internees were permitted to go down to the shore for a couple of hours daily. Men and women were still kept separated. After the women were transferred to Kuching, the men could spend the entire day at the beach. In March 1943 the men were also sent to Kuching.