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East-Indies camps ( Indische kamparchieven ENG )

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Ursuline Cloister in Buitenzorg

Town: Buitenzorg
District: West Java
Region: Java
Location: Buitenzorg (now Bogor) is situated on West Java, approximately 50 kilometres from Batavia (Jakarta). The cloister of the Sisters of Ursuline was on Hospitaalweg in the city center.
From July 1942 to October 1942 this location served as a civilian camp >>
Other name: Kloosterkamp
Internees: men
Number of internees: 700
Information: From July 1942, men from Buitenzorg, Soekaboemi and surroundings were interned in the cloister of the Sisters of Ursuline in Buitenzorg. The nuns stayed in a section of the cloister separated from the men’s camp by barbed wire. At the beginning of October the men were taken to a camp at the Kedoengbadak plantation.
Commendant: Matsuoda
Guards: Native police personnel

From July 1943 to October 1943 this location served as a civilian camp >>
Other name: Kloosterkamp
Internees: women and children
Number of internees: 30
Information: In 1943, approximately 30 British and American women and children stayed for several months in the cloister of the Sisters of Ursuline. They had been interned earlier in Sempoer and were awaiting further transport to Tangerang.
Guards: Native police personnel

From 10 October 1945 to 17 October 1945 this location served as a republican camp >>
Other name: Kloosterkamp
Internees: women and children
Information: During the bersiap period, women and children from Buitenzorg were granted safe shelter at the cloister of the Sisters of Ursuline. On 17 October they were freed by Gurkhas.

From 17 October 1945 to 30 October 1945 this location served as a relief camp >>
Other name: Kloosterkamp
Internees: women and children
Information: During the bersiap period, women and children from Buitenzorg were granted safe shelter at the cloister of the Sisters of Ursuline. On 17 October they were freed by Gurkhas, after which the cloister was guarded by British-Indies military personnel and Dutch RAPWI personnel. There was little food and drink, and the sanitary conditions were poor. From the end of October the women and children were taken to Kedoenghalang.
Guards: British-Indies military personnel